About Us

Skedaddle Kids Indoor Play Centre encourages kids to get back to basics, by playing and interacting with each other. With a strong commitment to providing a fun, stimulating and safe play environment, skedaddle kids is the ultimate indoor play centre. Located in Milton, Ontario to better suit the needs of parents in the surrounding area!

As a mother of two kids, I am always seeking a place to fulfill my children’s needs for activity and creativity. It’s challenging to find a place that offers both and is also open on the weekends. Hence, skedaddle kids was born! I believe physical activity and nutrition go hand in hand. We offer healthy snacks (all peanut free) to help with your child’s physical fitness at our indoor playground!

Keeping your kids happy and active is becoming harder and harder these days, especially when you consider the national statistics of childhood obesity. Our indoor play centre promotes healthy eating and enjoyable children’s physical fitness activities inside our clean and safe indoor play centre. For the first time, it is expected that Canada’s younger generation are expected to live shorter lives than their parents due to obesity. During the 25 years between 1978 and 2004, the number of overweight children has risen from 12% to 18%—obese children from 3% to 8%. It’s no secret that sport and recreation have been replaced by video games and computers.

Our indoor playground not only gives children the physical activity they need to be happy it is also enjoyable to them, promoting healthy lifestyles early on can lead to healthy choices later on in life.

How much activity do children need? There are times when it is necessary for a toddler to be confined to a stroller, baby seat or playpen, however, there are also times when children must be active so they can learn to walk, run and make physical activity a part of their everyday lives. To ensure you are offering your children the physical activity they require, please refer to the following charts:

Health Canada’s Recommendations for Physical Activity
for Children from Birth to 5 Years of Age:

AgeRecommendations for Physical ActivityRecommendations for Non-Physical Activity
Infant
(birth to 1 year)
Provide safe opportunities to explore their surroundings.

Create activities that help with the development of movement skills.

No recommendations.
Toddler
(1 to 3 years)
Everyday:

at least 30 minutes of structured physical activity.

at least 60 minutes and up to several hours of unstructured physical activity.

should develop basic movement skills that lead to more complex movement skills.

Should not have any more than 60 minutes at a time, except when sleeping.
Preschooler
(3 to 5 years)
Everyday:

at least 60 minutes of structured physical activity.

at least 60 minutes and up to several hours of unstructured physical activity.

should have some experience in movement skills that lead to more complex movement skills.

Should not have any more than 60 minutes at a time, except when sleeping.

The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends no more than one hour of screen time a day (TV, computer, video games).

Definitions
Structured Physical Activities: Any planned programs example gymnastics, swimming
lessons, etc.Unstructured Physical Activities: Playgrounds, play groups, going to the park etc.

Reference: National Association for Sport and Physical Education, (2002). Active Start, a Statement of Physical Activity Guidelines for Children Birth to Five Years. p. 5-11

Health Canada’s Recommendations for Physical Activity
for Children 6 to 14 Years of Age:

AgeRecommendations for Physical ActivityRecommendations for Non-Physical Activity
Children and Youth
(6 – 14 years)
Everyday:

60 minutes of moderate physical activity

>30 minutes of vigorous physical activity

For a total of 90 minutes a day

The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends no more than 2 hours per day for screen time (TV, computer, video games)
Definitions
Moderate Physical Activities: brisk walking, skating, or bike riding

Unstructured Physical Activities: running, basketball, soccer, supervised weight training

Reference: National Association for Sport and Physical Education, (2002). Active Start, a Statement of Physical Activity Guidelines for Children Birth to Five Years. p. 5-11

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